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WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
Jan 21, 2013 9:00pm EST
's a ritual. there's a lot of celebrities in the crowd. i learned he join us franklin roosevelt as the only president to take the oath four times. he did it over two terms though. >> do you want to explain that? >> well he did it twice the first time because of roberts and then he did it twice this time because of sunday. >> yesterday, roberts read from a piece of paper when he administered the formal oath. >> it's experience. you learn from experience. today it will be how obama tackles the speech. in the past it has been a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to br
Jan 18, 2013 10:30pm EST
tradition of the inauguration speech held at the capitol. that was in 1945 when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. franklin roosevelt, his third inauguration was done at the capitol, but his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this was not the inopportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. he decided on his own to move the inauguration to the south front of the capital. the joint committee was not happy with that decision. the president of the united states can decide above and beyond the date and the time everything else is tradition and can be changed. we reverted back to holding inaugurations at the capitol. we moved them from the east front to the west front and the crowd has been getting bigger and bigger. one reason on the west front is that you can accommodate more people. if you look at the photographs of the last several inaugurations, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was sworn in, the crowds went back to a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, at the crowd gets a little bit further
Jan 21, 2013 11:00pm PST
suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob woodward can speak on this, too-- at the beginning of his time he had both houses of congress in democratic hands. he was turning to something called impoundment saying i'm just not going to spend the money for these bills, these acts, these agencies that democrats are voting for in the house and senate and even in the absence of watergate it's possible that that could have gone to impeachment. >> rose: jon meacham in nashville, thomas jonathan van everyson after a successful first term in which the louisiana purchase was dominant he goes into the second term and what happens? >> well his second inaugural address is largely an attack on the press so he set a tone there. every subsequent president has wanted to do that, ma
Jan 21, 2013 10:15am EST
of a president to name something, i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress and was from day one in this country the president at the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these terms which are sort of created by presidents we think are, um, they are from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term "first lady." he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was "keep the ball rolling." i'm jumping around a little bit, but it's sort of fun. woodrow wilson had potomac fever which was something harry truman love offed to quote. -- loved to quote. watchful waiting was very closely associated with woodrow waiting first in his relationship to the dictatorship in mexico where
Jan 20, 2013 12:30pm EST
wants. franklin roosevelt in 1937 got in the biggest landslide in presidential history. the congress was more democratic than it had been in that century, has ever been since then, yet he saw the supreme court overruling program after program of his so he decided to come back and ask congress to be able to pack the courts with justices of his own choosing. they slapped it down, had a lot to do with that being a miserable term nap's what barack obama was talking about when he said overreach. >> james, i'm curious about potential powder kegs here. without thinking about things like natural disasters that could come along, what are things that you see as potentially plaguing this second term? does the arab spring and some negative fallout from that terrorism, anything else just -- >> bypass the natural disaster piece so quickly because i think that climb change is something that is not as random as we think it is. so this administration, because i think it owes it to the folk who put them in place, has to be knowledgeable about how our environment is going to unfold in the next several
Jan 20, 2013 9:30am PST
that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean the future. >> one example of this in history is that lincoln at the beginning of his presidency idolized george washington, thought a lot about him, but as the problems got more difficult, as he became in certain ways more radical he was much more interested in people like thomas jefferson. there is that evolution. >> so is there a concern that this president expressed when you had that intimate dinner about looking at history and where other presidents went wrong? >> i think most presidents know that in this off the record dinner. we won't go into a sort of a transcript, but i think you can see very much in terms of what he says in public and what he does that this is someone who, for instance, if you talk about lyndon johnson and the war in vietnam he not only know what is people are talking about but t
Jan 18, 2013 8:00pm EST
to make our government a place for what franklin roosevelt called bold, persistent experimentation, a government for our tomorrows, not our yesterdays. let us give this capital back to the people to whom it belongs. [applause] to renew america, we must meet challenges abroad as well as at home. there is no longer a clear division between what is foreign and what is domestic. the world economy, the world environment, the world aids crisis, the world arms race -- they affect us all. today, as an older order passes, the new world is more free but less stable. communism's collapse has called forth old animosities and new dangers. clearly, america must continue to lead the world we did so much to make. while america rebuilds at home, we will not shrink from the challenges nor fail to seize the opportunities of this new world. together with our friends and allies, we will work to shape change, lest it engulf us. when our vital interests are challenged or the will and conscience of the international community is defied, we will act, with peaceful diplomacy whenever possible, with force wh
Jan 20, 2013 6:30pm EST
. franklin roosevelt only gave 30 fireside chats in 12 years. he understood instinctively the dangers of overexposure. he also controlled the media to an extent that modern presidents could not hope to. host: looking back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. state of union address. there was the iran-contra sc andal. [video clip] >> i h
Jan 21, 2013 7:00am PST
of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that's the message on this martin luther king day. and he said when times change, so must we. so i think all of those things are right. and he said, you know, it's not what binds this nation together is not the color
Jan 15, 2013 9:00am PST
wallace, franklin delano roosevelt post of vice president and agriculture commerce secretary. it suggests that america would have been on a very different trajectory had his pass not been blocked in 1944. >> seeing the war clouds gathering on the horizon, roosevelt decided to run for a third term against the strongly anti-war candidate wendell willkie. the stakes were high. the nation would soon be a war. roosevelt weigh the options and chose a controversial secretary of agriculture, henry wallace, as his running mate. wallace had successfully overseen rebuilding after the depression. he had provided food stamps and school lunches. he instituted programs for land use planning and soil conservation. he carved out his credentials in the new year deals as an outspoken anti-fascist. he was considered the scientific community's best ally. he spoke out strongly against the building of a of racial theories in rebuke of the hitler polity -- policy. >> he first introduced me to the mysteries of plant fertilization. i spent a good many years breeding corn because the scientist deepened my appreciat
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)